Angkor Wat Travel Tips

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Angkor Wat Travel Tips
Angkor Wat Travel Tips

Visiting historical sites around the world has been one of my greatest pleasures from travelling. Being fond of world history (particularly European history), I have always thoroughly enjoyed the chance to feel as if I have walked through a time machine, and stepped out in another life, another world, another existence. Such is the case when you visit the great temples of Southeast Asia. Even more so than my trips to European countries, as I was not stepping back only hundreds of years, but all the way back to 802 AD. Unfathomable.

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Angkor Wat was built by the Khmer empire, and was once the seat that ruled much of Southeast Asia. This ancient city is now one of the most visited UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the world, attracting more than 2 million visitors per year.

Angkor Wat was built by the Khmer empire
Angkor Wat was built by the Khmer empire

My Visit to the Angkor Wat Temples

My visit to the Angkor Wat Temples was during the wet season (June-November), which had both pros and cons. First of all, there were far less tourists in Siem Reap (the city of which you base yourself to visit the temples)… so that was a bonus. But of course on the con side, it meant that there was often rain… and lots of it!

On the day we visited the temples (I was travelling solo and joined a travel group), there was rain on and off. This allowed for some great photos and some not-so-great photos. But alas, there were photos!

Another down side to the wet season is the fact that you have less a chance of capturing one of ‘those’ sunrises (the kind where the sky lights up and puts on a show for the photography enthusiasts). Unfortunately I so happened to stumble on an off day – with both rain and no colourful sky – but in the spirit of optimism, carried on to grab some photos anyway!

The Various Temples of Angkor Wat

Angkor Wat

As the largest religious monument in the entire world, it is little wonder the Angkor Wat temple itself is the most visited of the temples and most photographed. Originally constructed as a Hindu temple by the Khmer Empire, Angkor Wat temple eventually became a Buddhist temple by the 12th Century. Around the complex you will find endless bas-reliefs (2,600 feet to be exact), depicting the famous battles and scenes from battles. To get a more in-depth experience and walk away feeling educated, consider booking a guide for the day if you aren’t travelling as part of a tour.

The Bayon

The Bayon
The Bayon

The Bayon temple stands in the centre of Angkor Thom and was built by Jayavarman VII. This is the temple where you will find many statues of faces, which are a favourite among photographers.

Ta Prohm

Ta Prohm
Ta Prohm

Ta Prohm is the temple that is still entirely covered by the jungle, representing what it must have been like to re-discover the ancient temples back in the 19th Century. If you’re looking for those tree roots-over-ancient-temples photos, look no further! This is also a great look at the Cambodian wilderness.

Elephant Terrace

Elephant Terrace
Elephant Terrace

Literally as it sounds, a 1000 foot terrace of elephants. Be aware, this is a favourite among the snap-happy tourists!